Saigon Kids Emporium
May 2017
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Archives

Categories

INVITATION FROM SAIGON KIDS™ RICHARD AND JOHN TURNER TO CONTRIBUTE TO SAIGON PHOTO PROJECT

Submitted by Richard and John Turner (ACS)

Hello Saigon Kids™

My brother Richard and I are assembling a book of photographs taken by the Vietnamese photographers who worked for Star Photo, Provence Photo and the other photo kiosks located on Nguyen Hue (Charner Boulevard) sometimes known as Flower Street. We are interested in images of parties and other social events held by members of the American, French, Vietnamese and Chinese communities as well as by members of the diplomatic corps in Saigon between the years 1955 and 1965. These photographs were typically black and white, 2.5” x 5” with serrated edges. They were taken by a Vietnamese photographer who would be hired to cover events such as adult and teenage parties, diplomatic functions, holiday celebrations, tea dances at the Circle Sportif, events at the American Community School, etc. The photographer would usually shoot several rolls of film and they would be ready for viewing and purchase the next day at one of the many the Flower Street kiosks.

If you have any photographs that fit this general description, we would appreciate it if you could scan them (at 300 dpi) and email or *Dropbox* them to me at *folk1 [@] mindspring.com* and *cc turner [@] chapman.edu*

If we get enough photographs (approximately 100 – 150) we will compile them in a Blurb / Shutterfly publication that will be available for viewing and purchase online. The photographs will be accompanied by an essay about the images and the unique time period that they evoke

We hope that you will participate in this project. Without your help it will not happen. If you know someone who may have photographs to contribute to the project, please pass this invitation along to them. Any questions, please contact us at either of the above email addresses.

John and Richard Turner

American Community School 1959-61

9th ANNIVERSARY MESSAGE FROM BOB

by Admin

Hello Saigon Kids™ …

Today is the 9 year anniversary of the launching of this website. WOW! Where did the time go. It seems like just a few months ago that I clicked my mouse publishing the site live on the internet.

I hope all you Saigon Kids™ have enjoyed the site and will continue too for many years into the future.

So join with me in celebrating the 9th anniversary of our site.

As you’ve probably notice I haven’t added very much content to the site over the past year or so. Hence, I thought I’d take this opportunity to fill you in on what’s been going on and plans for the future.

As I’d mentioned 3 or 4 years ago, I was in the process at that time of rearranging my affairs to allow me to spend the rest of my life traveling. I accomplished that about 2 years ago and set off traveling around the USA initially and later abroad. All the while operating my businesses remotely with the help of virtual assistants. Initially, I was doing short trips while working the bugs out of operating remotely. By early to mid 2015 I had everything running smoothly and got down to some serious traveling.

I’ve been able to visit with many friends, associates and relatives along the way over the past couple years.

In mid 2015 I took off on a 240 mile solo hike of the JMT climbing to the highest mountain peak in the USA (click here to read about it).

After returning back home, I continued with the planning and organization of my upcoming old original Silk Road expedition from China to Rome (click here to read about it – scroll down to near bottom of page). Given the current political unrest in many of the areas the original Silk Road crosses through, this is proving to be a challenge obtaining all the necessary travel documents, shipping to resupply points, arranging for escorts for safe passage through  areas of unrest, etc. etc. etc. As of this writing about 60% of the necessary arrangements are complete. It appears it will take about another 6 months to a year before everything is in place and we can take off … finally!

Other things I’ve been busy with are:

  •  Sold 3 of my businesses.
  • Started 2 new businesses.
  • Wrote and published 16 new eBooks.
  • Created and published a video training course consisting of 700+ instructional videos.
  • Traveled to Tokyo, Hong Kong, South Korea, Malaysia, Viet Nam, Cambodia, Thailand, Nepal, India, Manali, Netherlands, and London.
  • Recently complete a woodworking project I originally started sourcing the wood for it in the late 1970s in the forests of Cambodia and Thailand. In the near future I’ll post an article about it on the website. It’s a crazy story about how this came to be.

I’ve been involved in a bunch of other stuff too, that I don’t remember at the moment off the top of my head.

So what’s in the future for this website? I’ll be continuing it using virtual assistants to do most of the behind the scenes day-to-day routine work to maintain the site.

I’ll be posting content and articles to the site on a regular basis. Although not as frequently as I did in the past. From launching the site in 2009 through 2015 I personally researched, created, edited and posted 1058 articles to the site. That doesn’t include photos and videos I sourced, edited and posted to the site. Nor, about 200 articles, photos and videos submitted by Saigon Kids™ that I edited and posted to the site. Time wise it takes an average of 2-3 hours to research, source, create, edit and post an article of content to the site … do the math and you’ll realize how much time I’ve invested into the site. And, that doesn’t include the time spent doing the daily maintenance chores to keep the site running and functioning properly. Staggering, isn’t it?!

For the next few months the primary focus will be on completing the *A Day In The Life* project started some time ago. It seemed to have stalled. So Kevin Wells and myself have fired it up again starting with Phase Two (click here for information about it and to submit your story). Hopefully, this time around more of you will get on board and participate by writing and submitting your stories. Once the project is completed it will be compiled into a book. And, maybe even a video.

Additionally, I’ll be posting other relevant content articles to the site here and there.

So my question to you all is, what do you want to see more of in the way of content? Let me know in the Comments Section below.

Until the next time … Happy 9th Anniversary Saigon Kids™. I hope you’ve enjoyed the site so far and will continue to enjoy it for a long time into the future …

Rock Onnnnnnnnnn….

Bob

Saigon Life 1955 – 1965: A Day In The Life …

by Admin and Richard Turner, Contributing Editor
© SaigonKidsAmericanCommunitySchool.Com

A Day in the Life: Saigon 1955 – 1965

The Saigon Kids American Community School website is assembling an archive of stories by people who lived in Saigon between 1955 and 1965.

This is your story.

We need your help.

The structure for the narrative is *A Day in the Life* of the members of the American international community in Saigon and their French, Vietnamese and Chinese friends and acquaintances.

The project will be completed in stages of 1 to 2 months each, ending in one year.Saigon Life 1955-65

The accompanying outline (with suggested topics) is the framework we will use to organize your accounts of life in Saigon.

Many of you have already sent poignant, humorous or thought-provoking recollections to the website.  We will begin the task of creating *A Day in the Life* by plugging these entries into the outline in the appropriate places. The author of each entry will be identified as will the years that the author lived in Saigon, eg. Jane Doe 1961-1963.

These entries and the material you send us will be arranged chronologically in terms of the time of day that it references and by subject matter.  For example all of your stories about afternoons at the Cirque Sportif would be grouped together.

Your contributions to *A Day in the Life* can be fact or fiction.

They can be brief or lengthy.

They can be something you have written or something written by another person, so long as the original author is credited.

We also want your images of life in Saigon to illustrate this history. Scan your photographs, slides, etc. and send them to the website. Identify, as best you can, the people in the photos and the events that they represent. If you have home movies taken while in Saigon that you’d like to transfer to DVD contact us for assistance instructions.

So, send us your stories and your images.

We were participants in a unique period of history.

No one can tell this story better than we can.

Submission Guidelines:

Submit all stories via the *Contact Form* on the website.

Stories should be submitted as a text document (MS Word, Note Pad, Open Office Writer, etc.).

Please include your name and the time period you were in Saigon. Ladies please include your maiden and married last name.

When submitting longer stories, please submit them as an *Attachment* to your message on the Contact Form by copying the text document with your story to a File Folder on your computer, ZIP (compress) the File Folder and send the File Folder containing your story as an *Attachment*.

Photos and images should be cropped, re-sized to 1000 pixels wide, and submitted in JPEG format.

Photos and images should include information identifying the people in them, location, event and approximate date taken (month and year, or at least the year).

Photos and images should be sent as an *Attachment* to your Contact Form message. When submitting multiple text files, photos/images copy them to a File Folder on your computer, then ZIP (compress) the File Folder and send the ZIP File Folder containing the text files and photos/images as an *Attachment*.

All photos/images must be your own. If they are not your own photos/images you’ll need to submit documentation the owner and/or copyright holder of the photos/images has granted you written permission and license to use them.

Phase Two

This phase of *A Day in the Life* project will focus on — *Saigon Arrival*. This phase will last for about 2 months during which we invite you to submit your stories about why and how you came to Saigon.

  • How did you arrive in Saigon – plane or boat?
  • What were your first impressions when Saigon first came into view?
  • What was your and your family’s reaction upon disembarking in Saigon?
  • Who greeted you upon arrival in Saigon?
  • What was your trip to your first living quarters in Saigon like?
  • What sights, sounds, smells, people did you experience while traveling to your temporary quarters?
  • Where did you stay in Saigon until your permanent housing was arranged?
  • What where your first impressions and reaction to your temporary quarters?
  • Who introduced you to the other kids in Saigon?
  • What was your first day in Saigon like?
  • What do you remember most about your first day in Saigon?

Submit your *Before Saigon* stories and photographs by using the
*Contact Form*.

CLICK HERE To Go To CONTACT FORM

Phase One

The first phase of *A Day in the Life* project will focus on — *Before Saigon*. This phase will last for about 2 months during which we invite you to submit your stories about why and how you came to Saigon.

  • What Brought you to Saigon?
  • Where were you when you learned you were going to Saigon?
  • How did you learn you were going to Saigon?
  • What was your initial reaction when you learned you were going to Saigon?
  • What was the reaction of your family members when they learned you were going to Saigon?
  • What was the reaction of your friends when you told them you were going to Saigon?
  • What was the reaction of your teachers and other community members when you told them you were going to Saigon?
  • What was preparing for your trip to Saigon like?
  • What was your trip to Saigon like?
  • What places did you visit en-route to Saigon?
  • What do you remember most about preparing for and traveling to Saigon?
  • How did you feel about moving to Saigon?
  • What feelings did you experience leaving your friends, class mates, family and community members to go to Saigon?

Submit your *Before Saigon* stories and photographs by using the
*Contact Form*.

CLICK HERE To Go To CONTACT FORM

Use the Comments form below if you have questions or need additional assistance or guidance.

Saigon Life 1955 -1965: A Day In The Life … Saigon Arrival

by Admin and Contributing Editors Richard Turner and Kevin Wells
© SaigonKidsAmericanCommunitySchool.Com

Below are Saigon Kids™ stories about our Saigon Arrival – when and how we arrived in Saigon and our initial impressions and experiences.

Bob LaysonBob Layson (1959-61)
How Did Mrs. Yamaguchi Know?!

After landing the plane taxied to the arrival gate. I watched out the window as they rolled the exit ramp in place. Once it was positioned they announced we could exit the plane and proceed to the terminal. Since we were in First Class they had us exit first. Following my parents I stepped out of the plane onto the ramp…. Continue Reading HERE

Kevin Wells

Kevin Well (1959-62)
USOM Guest House

Everybody new to Saigon had to start somewhere and our start was at the US Overseas Missions (USOM) Guest House. It was our first night and I lugged the luggage up the stairs, flailed my way through the mosquito netting and fell face-down on the bed. By the morning, the air conditioner had lowered the air temperature to a mere … Continue Reading HERE

Submit your *Before Saigon* stories and photographs by using the
*Contact Form*.

CLICK HERE To Go To CONTACT FORM

SAIGON ARRIVAL: KEVIN WELLS

by Admin and Contributing Editors Richard Turner and Kevin Wells
© SaigonKidsAmericanCommunitySchool.Com

Kevin Wells

Kevin Wells (1959-62)

Arriving In Saigon: USOM Guest House

Everybody new to Saigon had to start somewhere and our start was at the US Overseas Missions (USOM) Guest House.

It was our first night and I lugged the luggage up the stairs, flailed my way through the mosquito netting and fell face-down on the bed. By the morning, the air conditioner had lowered the air temperature to a mere 85 degrees Fahrenheit.

I looked like I had lost war with mosquitoes. The prickly heat rash was bad enough but not yet in full bloom and it was time for breakfast. That morning, I discovered that the hot water tap was on the opposite side from the US convention and hot water is generally only slightly above normal body temperature.

It was still the children are to be seen and not heard era so I got my orders. Full formal table manners were in effect until further notice and I was to help keep my siblings under control. As the oldest of the siblings, I had my duties. What I had not experienced before was a Chef and someone who served the meal, neither of whom was my mother.

This was new territory. Families necessarily have cooks, but a Chef and one trained in the French style was something new to me. My mother had constraints that apparently had no effect on the Chef. Chief among the constraints was that she was a one-woman show, mother of five, Chief Cook and Bottle washer, Chief of Procurement, Nutritionist, Maid, Laundry Maid, Chief Medical Officer, and more as the situation developed. As a result, her cooking style was workman-like. The family had no complaint because the food hit the table at the correct time. There were five growing boys and one girl and whoever at the fastest got the most. One of the phrases I remember from childhood was her entreaty to “Leave something for your father!” We could snarf down groceries! Those ways were over, it was time for proper table manners.

The new normal of the next few weeks was a culinary adventure. I became a life-long fan of baguette, onion soup, crepes, chocolate mousse, tournedos chasseur, bouillabaisse, omelets, vichyssoise, comfit, tarte tatin, and a wide range of other staples of French cuisine. The real surprise was éclair and cream-puff desserts. Yes, I would drink the Merlot, and got caught).

The other new feature of the new normal was the fact that I could not conduct refrigerator raids. That was the bad news. The good news is that the Chef was not averse to slipping me goodies now and again. He was a character and a memorable one at that.

The USOM guest house is where I learned that anyone who could possibly do so retired to a cool place after lunch and maintained a low profile until 2:30 or so when it again became safe to go into the sun. Being young, it took several weeks and complaints from adults to teach me that those with experience really did know best about such things.
The USOM Guest house was the departure point for my first taxi adventure, and the place to which I returned when new families arrived. It was also my introduction to the mysterious world of people who would not discuss what they were doing in Saigon. Actually, what was most fascinating was that adults would make cryptic remarks about others. We in the underclass started to put together our intelligence networks.

It was at the USOM Guest House that I started reading Time and Newsweek in an effort to understand the dynamics of the place. There was also the Times of Viet Nam, which was my first introduction to the gulf between what a native English speaker knows and what is learned at school. One memorable article included the account of a wedding of two diplomats. With a light tone, the Times of Viet Nam reporter wrote that “the wedding was consummated on the embassy lawn much to the delight of the assembled guests.”

A quick check of the dictionary told me what I had missed.

“I can’t say what it was that made me fall in love with Viet Nam, everything is so intense, the colors, the tastes, even the rain They say whatever you are looking for you will find here.

They say you come to Viet Nam, understand a lot in a few weeks, the rest has got to be lived.” (Movie; The Quiet American, 2003)

Submit your *Before Saigon* stories and photographs by using the
*Contact Form*.

CLICK HERE To Go To CONTACT FORM